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【年間プログラム】自動車の安全と自律運転のマーケットリサーチ

Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Research

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自動車の安全と自律運転 ABIリサーチのマーケットリサーチ
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自動車の自律運転技術は、自動車産業の内外で、活発に開発や試験が行われており、エコシステムへの大きな影響や、安全、交通量、効率化に未知の利益をもたらすことが期待されている。運転者不要の自動車による社会的・経済的な利益が、サービス概念としての自動車を実現し、自動車所有の概念も運転経験も物流をも革新するだろう。米国調査会社ABIリサーチの「【年間プログラム】自動車の安全と自律運転のマーケットリサーチ」は、下記の4つの自動車安全の課題について調査している。

  • フェーズ1:パッシブセーフティ - 従来のテレマティックスサービス(eCall、bCall、SVT、遠隔診断、UBI)とサイバーセキュリティ防御
  • フェーズ2:アクティブセーフティ - レーダ、カメラ、ソナーセンサなどの障害物検知と衝突回避などのADAS機能
  • フェーズ3:協調セーフティ - DSRC、LTEなどの技術による車車間と車インフラ間のアプリケーション
  • フェーズ4:自律運転自動車 - セルラー、V2XとADAS技術の集結による無事故を実現する最終段階

Autonomous vehicle technology is actively being developed and tested both inside and outside the automotive industry and is expected to have profound impact on the ecosystem as well as bring unseen benefits of safety, traffic flow and efficiency. It will also benefit the wider society and economy as driverless vehicles will enable the car as a service concept, revolutionize the very concept of car ownership, the driving experience and the transportation of goods.

This service offers a unique and holistic perspective on the entire automotive safety challenge covering the 4 phases of the automotive roadmap:

• Phase 1 - Passive Safety - Traditional telematics services (eCall, bCall, SVT, remote diagnostics, and UBI) and cybersecurity protection

• Phase 2 - Active Safety – ADAS features for obstacle detection and collision avoidance based on Radar, camera, and sonar sensors

• Phase 3 - Cooperative Safety – Vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure applications based on DSRC, LTE and other technologies

• Phase 4 - Autonomous Vehicles – The final step for realizing the end goal of a zero accident environment aggregating cellular, V2X, and ADAS technologies

Service Coverage

  • Advanced Driver Assistance Systems – Features (LDW, ACC, FCW, LKA, BSD, DMS, night vision), technologies (radar, camera), forecasts, market drivers, ecosystem, and converged solutions
  • Autonomous driving and driverless cars - Technology outlook, case studies and trials, technologies, legislation, forecasts, and the wider impact on the automotive and transportation industries
  • Advanced remote diagnostics, service models, & CRM
  • Emergency calling (eCall) and roadside assistance (bCall)
  • Stolen vehicle tracking, slow down, and recovery
  • Connected car cybersecurity
  • In-vehicle networking
  • Telematics mandates in Europe, Russia, Brazil and US
  • Advanced Insurance Telematics and UBI solutions
  • Global and regional OEM and aftermarket telematics shipments, subscribers, and revenues


 

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Autonomous Vehicles Disrupt Tier 1 Supplier Roles as ADAS Ecosystem Expands

London, United Kingdom - 16 May 2016

ABI Research, the leader in transformative technology innovation market intelligence, finds Tier 1 suppliers are losing their roles as system innovators and developers in the nascent autonomous vehicle market. This is occurring as more OEMs engage directly with software developers and hardware and semiconductor vendors.

“It is becoming increasingly evident that no single Tier 1 supplier can deliver a complete autonomous driving system,” says James Hodgson, Industry Analyst at ABI Research. “As a result, OEMs are increasingly engaging directly with component vendors, and becoming more aligned with product roadmaps from across the value chain. But Tier 1s will not disappear completely and still hold an important role in functional safety, one which requires a more overarching and holistic view than any component vendor can hold.”

In fact, the growing engagement of OEMs with component suppliers may prove more of a help than a hindrance to Tier 1s. This will be as OEMs increase their awareness of the capacities of the various components that constitute ADAS systems and the level of functionalities that they can feasibly achieve.

Evidence of OEM commitment to autonomous driving is apparent from recent M&A activity. This includes the purchase of HERE maps by Audi, BMW, and Daimler and GM’s purchase of Cruise Automation, showing that, where necessary, OEMs are willing to own parts of the ADAS value chain in order to secure the necessary assets to enable autonomous driving.

The ADAS ecosystem will be further disrupted by the entry of new comers to automotive, as the increasing sophistication of ADAS necessitates greater processing power, attracting vendors such as NVIDIA, Qualcomm and Intel to join the ADAS semiconductor market currently dominated by NXP and Renesas. Such vendors have a clear strategy of entering the vehicle via the infotainment system, before building the relationships and demonstrating the competency required for safety-critical applications in ADAS. However, this approach is not unique to new comers, as Hodgson explains:

“There is a growing trend in which incumbent players reposition or widen their automotive product portfolios to extend beyond infotainment,” concludes Hodgson. “For example, recent hires and product launches by Visteon and Harman, vendors traditionally known for their infotainment offerings, signal an attempt by these companies to improve their growth through entry into ADAS.”

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Service, which includes research reports, market data, insights, and competitive assessments.

 


Automotive Application Frameworks, OTA, Analytics, and IoE to Boost Uptake of Cloud-based Vehicle Platforms

London, United Kingdom - 22 Jun 2015

The emergence of connected infotainment services such as off-board navigation, social media integration, music streaming, and in-car Wi-Fi and accompanying application frameworks is driving the adoption of cloud-based vehicle platforms enabled by embedded or tethered 4G broadband cellular connectivity. However, more strategic functionality such as OTA for vehicle lifecycle management, analytics and big data for smart mobility and autonomous driving, and how cars will interact with the wider IoE for services such as vehicle-to-grid and vehicle-to-home will be the key drivers propelling the cloud into a mainstream automotive technology.By 2020, more than 40 million cloud-enabled vehicles will ship yearly.

“Despite the numerous benefits of the cloud including flexibility, scalability, real-time updates, and customization, the specific nature of automotive solutions imposes the need for hybrid solutions, guaranteeing uninterrupted performance when the connection is temporarily lost, for example, through hybrid navigation as touted by vendors such as HERE. On the other hand, vehicle-centric and safety-critical features such as ADAS and automated driving will heavily rely on on-board processing due to low latency, availability, and reliability requirements for features such as collision detection with the cloud playing a more complementary role. It is this delicate balance between on-board and cloud-based service delivery that will constitute the very character of next-generation connected car solutions,” says VP and Practice Director Dominique Bonte.

At the same time, the proliferation of cloud platforms adds to already growing concerns about privacy breaches and security threats, which in turn impacts safety. However, the cloud itself will turn out to be the best possible protection allowing real-time monitoring and updates, not just for adding or improving features but also to remotely fix security gaps, as BMW recently found. Inevitably, big IT companies Microsoft and IBM, but also vendors such as Ericsson and Verizon, are positioning themselves as key providers in this new automotive environment.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Infotainment, Commercial Vehicle Telematics and Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Research Services.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe, and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

 


 

Global Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) Market to Exceed US$90 Billion by 2020

Research News

London, United Kingdom - 26 Jan 2015

​Market research firm ABI Research forecasts that the market for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) will grow from US$11.1 billion in 2014 to US$91.9 billion by 2020, passing the US$200 billion mark by 2024.

ADAS packages have long been available as optional extras on luxury and executive vehicles, but recent years have seen the more popular systems penetrating through to affordable family cars and even superminis. “Toyota’s planned rollout of the Safety Sense P and Safety Sense C packages is just one example of the drive by OEMs to bring ADAS to the mass market,” says Research Analyst James Hodgson.

One of the most popular systems on high-end vehicles, adaptive cruise control (ACC), will continue to gain popularity across all vehicle segments, with shipments experiencing a CAGR of 69% between 2014 and 2020. Systems with a lower perceived customer value, such as night vision (NV), will remain the preserve of luxury vehicles for the immediate future, with NV shipments totaling less than one-tenth of ACC shipments in 2020.

Safety rating agencies, such as NCAP, are continuing to devise tests which demonstrate the contribution of active systems to public safety. “These tests augment the organic growth of consumer acceptance, while OEMs strive to update their models in order to secure those all-important five star ratings,” Hodgson explains. The timetable for the introduction of these tests differs by region, which means ADAS availability and adoption will vary geographically—this effect will be further compounded by localized legislative changes.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Research.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

 


Interior Cameras and Eye-tracking to Dominate Driver Monitoring Technology in Active Safety, Autonomous Driving, and Smart HMI Era

Research News

 

London, United Kingdom - 13 Nov 2014

Global shipments of factory-installed Driver Monitoring Systems (DMS) systems based on interior facing cameras will reach 6.7 million by 2019, according to recent findings from ABI Research. “DMS solutions are expected to gain new momentum as critical support systems for human-machine interactions (HMI) related to ADAS active safety alerts and autonomous-to-manual handover but also as solutions enabling smart dashboards and contextual HMI in an in-vehicle environment increasingly characterized by information overload,” comments VP and Practice Director Dominique Bonte.

In particular, eye-tracking technology allowing gaze direction and eyelid movement analysis, as well as facial recognition will emerge as the key DMS technology, gradually replacing traditional approaches. At the same time it will enable a wider set of applications including personalization, security, health tracking, and distraction and fatigue detection.

While Mercedes-Benz’s Attention Assist, Ford’s Driver Alert, Volvo’s Driver Alert Control, and Volkswagen’s Fatigue Detection use a combination of legacy technologies such as forward facing cameras, steering wheel angle, and vehicle sensors, Toyota has already deployed eye-tracking systems in its Lexus brand, with Volvo (Driver State Estimation) and GM planning future deployments.

Toyota supplier Aisin, Continental (Driver Focus), Visteon (HMeye), Takata, Seeing Machines, and Tobii are jockeying for position in an increasingly competitive eye-tracking ecosystem. NVIDIA and Intel (partnership with Ford) are also showing interest in the eye-tracking market. Vendors such as SmartDrive and Lytx are mainly targeting commercial vehicle fleets with video analytics solutions.

The Driver Monitoring Systems study describes driver monitoring use cases and applications, issues and challenges, main solutions and vendors and includes shipment, revenue, and installed base forecasts. It is part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Research which covers OEM and aftermarket telematics solutions, ADAS and active safety and autonomous vehicles.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.


Autonomous Vehicle Market Hijacked by Legislation and Liability Issues

 

Research News

London, United Kingdom - 26 Sep 2014

​“Legislation and liability issues and uncertainties are expected to remain the main obstacles for autonomous vehicles becoming widely adopted in the next decade. Current autonomous vehicle legislation is fragmented, with rulemaking often passed on a local, less competent level due to the lack of national or international guidance, for example from NHTSA (U.S.) or the EU. However, the recently amended UN convention on Road Traffic is a notable exception, though the condition the driver should at all times be able to override or switch off autonomous features precludes fully driverless vehicles,” says VP and practice director Dominique Bonte.

In the United States, California is leading the way not only having approved legislation for testing but also preparing rules for commercially operating autonomous vehicles on public roads. Isolated initiatives in other regions such as Sweden and Japan are largely related to projects from national car brands Volvo and Nissan. However, governments in countries such as the United Kingdom and Singapore are actively promoting autonomous driving as a key future intelligent transportation technology.

Closely linked with the lack of legislation, the uncertainty surrounding liability keeps many car OEMs from aggressively pushing autonomous technology, many of which are already heavily involved in recall related liability cases, fearing autonomous driving will further shift liability from the driver to the car maker. The role of governments will be critical, especially for proposing and regulating liability limiting and/or sharing mechanisms, including taking on some of the liability themselves, especially where cooperative V2X systems are involved, in order to reduce legal exposure of the industry which threatens to stifle innovation.

While the emergence of autonomous vehicle technology is very visible and dramatic, it is just one example of the more general automation trend in the wider IoT across a large number of industries including energy, transportation, healthcare, telecommunications (SONs), aviation, smart buildings and the military sector which will face similar legislation and liability questions. It represents a huge challenge and opportunity for both public law makers and private legal practices.

ABI Research’s Autonomous Driving Legislation and Liability report is part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Researchwhich covers OEM and aftermarket telematics, infotainment and connected car solutions, ADAS, active safety and autonomous vehicles.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.


Autonomous Vehicle Market Hijacked by Legislation and Liability Issues

Research News

 

London, United Kingdom - 26 Sep 2014

​“Legislation and liability issues and uncertainties are expected to remain the main obstacles for autonomous vehicles becoming widely adopted in the next decade. Current autonomous vehicle legislation is fragmented, with rulemaking often passed on a local, less competent level due to the lack of national or international guidance, for example from NHTSA (U.S.) or the EU. However, the recently amended UN convention on Road Traffic is a notable exception, though the condition the driver should at all times be able to override or switch off autonomous features precludes fully driverless vehicles,” says VP and practice director Dominique Bonte.

In the United States, California is leading the way not only having approved legislation for testing but also preparing rules for commercially operating autonomous vehicles on public roads. Isolated initiatives in other regions such as Sweden and Japan are largely related to projects from national car brands Volvo and Nissan. However, governments in countries such as the United Kingdom and Singapore are actively promoting autonomous driving as a key future intelligent transportation technology.

Closely linked with the lack of legislation, the uncertainty surrounding liability keeps many car OEMs from aggressively pushing autonomous technology, many of which are already heavily involved in recall related liability cases, fearing autonomous driving will further shift liability from the driver to the car maker. The role of governments will be critical, especially for proposing and regulating liability limiting and/or sharing mechanisms, including taking on some of the liability themselves, especially where cooperative V2X systems are involved, in order to reduce legal exposure of the industry which threatens to stifle innovation.

While the emergence of autonomous vehicle technology is very visible and dramatic, it is just one example of the more general automation trend in the wider IoT across a large number of industries including energy, transportation, healthcare, telecommunications (SONs), aviation, smart buildings and the military sector which will face similar legislation and liability questions. It represents a huge challenge and opportunity for both public law makers and private legal practices.

ABI Research’s Autonomous Driving Legislation and Liability report is part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Researchwhich covers OEM and aftermarket telematics, infotainment and connected car solutions, ADAS, active safety and autonomous vehicles.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.


New Entrants Intel, NVIDIA, and Qualcomm to Push Automotive Head-unit Processor Revenues to $1.95 Billion by 2020

 

London, United Kingdom - 18 Aug 2014

Automotive head-unit processor revenues are expected to grow from $680 million in 2013 to $1.95 Billion in 2020.

“Automotive head-units are transitioning from proprietary architectures requiring long development cycles and Tier1-led integration efforts towards platform designs. Ford set the tone back in 2007 with its SYNC solution based on CPU hardware from Freescale and the Windows Embedded OS allowing quicker development time frames and independence from the previously dominant Tier1 suppliers. With head-unit infotainment, HMI, clusters, safety, and telematics complexity continuing to increase, hardware approaches are consolidating and evolving towards reference designs and open platforms such as the open source GENIVI stack, already adopted by BMW. This allows car OEMs to increase the reuse of software and middleware while decreasing costs and time-to-market and at the same time leveraging open ecosystems of suppliers,” says VP and practice director Dominique Bonte.

Consumer chipset vendors such as Intel, Qualcomm, Broadcom, and NVIDIA are increasingly targeting automotive as a new business development opportunity, hereby competing with established automotive chipset suppliers such as Freescale, Renesas, TI, and STMicroelectronics.

While automotive semiconductor vendors still enjoy the highest market shares in computing processors (Freescale) and Bluetooth (CSR), consumer chipset players such as Qualcomm and Broadcom already have the highest market shares in cellular baseband and Wi-Fi chipsets respectively.

Newcomers in automotive computing processors such as NVIDIA, Qualcomm, and Intel are just starting to grab market share but will become major players in the future driven by platform approaches and automotive grade chipset designs. They are keen to leverage their multi-core CPU architectures and graphics engine assets to capitalize on the sharply increasing need for real-time in-vehicle computing for advanced multimedia, ADAS machine vision image processing and ultimately autonomous vehicle algorithms.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Infotainment and Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Research which covers OEM and aftermarket telematics, infotainment and connected car solutions, ADAS, active safety and autonomous vehicles.Market Research which covers OEM and aftermarket telematics, infotainment and connected car solutions, ADAS, active safety and autonomous vehicles.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

 


 

Sensors, Semiconductors, Autonomous Driving, and Regulation to Drive ADAS Revolution

 

London, United Kingdom - 05 Aug 2014

​Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) are essentially driven by a sensor fusion revolution combining radar (forward looking obstacle detection), camera (pedestrian detection, lane keeping, driver monitoring), infra-red (night vision), ultrasonic (automated parking), and LiDAR sensors.

While radar will remain a key technology, boosted by the 79 GHz spectrum band expected to become available globally, camera sensors and machine vision technology hold the promise of propelling ADAS into the mainstream because of its lower cost, flexibility, and multi-purpose character.

ABI Research forecasts automotive camera sensor shipments to reach 197 million by 2020. Main optical sensor suppliers include Aptina (recently acquired by ON Semiconductor), OmniVision, Sony, STMicro, and Toshiba. LiDAR and IR sensor uptake will remain limited during the forecast period due to its high cost.

“Advances in RF transceivers, microcontrollers, and open platforms are also critical as they allow cost reduction through ECU consolidation by sharing MCUs across multiple sensors, and the promise for car OEMs of the availability of end-to-end solutions via ecosystems of software and application vendors. This is illustrated by Freescale’s recent partnerships with CogniVue, Neusoft, and Green Hills,” comments VP and practice director Dominique Bonte.

However, the arrival of autonomous driving will be the single biggest driver for the uptake of ADAS, which will be a critical component of driverless car technology.In the meantime, ADAS should be seen as a precursor of self-driving vehicles and is already becoming the subject of regulation, with the European NCAP including the presence of Speed Assistance Systems, Autonomous Emergency Braking, and Lane Departure Warning/Lane Keep Assist as criteria to determine safety ratings. In the United States similar initiatives are being discussed by NHTSA which recently proposed changes to its five-star safety program.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Researchwhich covers OEM and aftermarket telematics solutions, ADAS and active safety and autonomous vehicles.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

 


Smart Car Innovation and Value Creation to Shift to the Boundaries between Automotive and other IoT Segments

 

London, United Kingdom - 18 Jun 2014

“For the automotive industry the emergence of the IoT constitutes a disruptive and transformative environment characterized by value chain and business model upheaval and a ‘collaborate or die’ ecosystem friction reality prompting it to redefine and reinvent itself in order to capitalize on the huge opportunities in the new IoT economy. The absorption of the automotive industry in the wider IoT is driven by new connected car use cases such as EVs as a mobile grid and vehicles used as delivery locations. As this IoT revolution unfolds, automotive innovation and value creation will be shifting to the boundaries with other verticals such as home automation, smart grids, smart cities, healthcare and retail,” says ABI Research VP and practice director Dominique Bonte.

Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle-to-Retail (V2R) will be the dominant segments with respectively 459 and 406 million vehicles featuring smart car IoT applications by 2030, followed by V2H (Vehicle-to-Home) and V2P (Vehicle-to-Person) with 163 and 239 million vehicles respectively. Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) services will be offered on 50 million vehicles in 2030.

High profile examples of connected car IoT applications include Volvo’s Roam Delivery service, the partnership between Mercedes-Benz and Nest (Google) on remotely controlling home thermostats, the Toyota-Panasonic cooperation to integrate cars with home appliances, Vehicle-to-Grid services from GM and Toyota, and Nissan’s Nismo smart watch combining personal healthcare with vehicles diagnostics.

However, in order to fully unlock the automotive IoT potential it will be critical to address a wide range of barriers including security, safety, regulation, lack of cross industry standards, widely varying industry dynamics and lifecycles, and limited initial addressable market sizes.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving and Smart Transportation Market Research which covers urbanization and mega city trends, cooperative ITS technologies, electric vehicles and charging infrastructure, Vehicle-to-Vehicle and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure, Electronic Toll Collect, and Traffic Management, and Information Systems.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

 


 

Market for Front Collision Warning and Mitigation Systems to Reach $29.5 Billion by 2020

 

London, United Kingdom - 07 Apr 2014

​ABI Research forecasts that the global market for Collision Warning and Mitigation Systems will reach $29.5 billion by the end of 2020 with the majority of the market value being accounted for by vehicles sold in the Asia-Pacific region.

“During the past 12 to 18 months, there has been a marked increase in awareness of the potential of advanced driver assistance systems such as Collision Warning and Mitigation Systems (CWM) among car OEMs, driven mainly by the decision of ratings agencies such as EuroNCAP to include ‘active’ systems in their latest test specifications,” comments Dominique Bonte, VP and practice director, at ABI Research.

Insurance claims data suggest that CWM systems can reduce rear-end crashes by one quarter or more and lead to a significant reduction in injuries. Although brands such as Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz and Volvo have been offering CWM systems for several years, such systems are now being offered for the first time by an increasing number of mass-market OEMs such as Hyundai, Nissan, Mitsubishi, PSN, Renault, Skoda, and Volkswagen in select 2014/15 models.

In addition, CWM systems are becoming increasingly more sophisticated with some capable of detecting pedestrians and bicycles even in poor visibility conditions and at night. However, tests carried out in both Europe and the United States demonstrate that there is often substantial differences in performance between CWM systems offered by various OEMs, due mainly to the type and number of sensors employed.

On the other hand, seeing one car avoiding a collision whereas another ploughs into the car in-front is a powerful image that will surely play a strong role in influencing the purchasing decisions of any safety-conscious buyer, particularly parents.For those OEMs who score well in these types of tests this is clearly a marketing opportunity to be leveraged to the hilt, whilst for the others it is a wake-up call, particularly those OEMs that do not offer any of these systems at the present time.

These findings are part of ABI Research’s Automotive Safety and Autonomous Driving Market Research which includes detailed installed base and forecasts of ADAS systems by regions.

ABI Research provides in-depth analysis and quantitative forecasting of trends in global connectivity and other emerging technologies. From offices in North America, Europe and Asia, ABI Research’s worldwide team of experts advises thousands of decision makers through 70+ research and advisory services. Est. 1990.

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